Jordan Peele wants to continue making movies as powerful as 'Get Out'.

The 38-year-old actor and filmmaker - whose debut has received numerous award nominations, including Best Picture at the Oscars - tackled the prejudice interracial couples face in the award-winning feature, but he has plans to "address" other issues in his next big gig.

Peele would like to continue in the horror/thriller genre as he believes it's what he does best.

In an interview with The Hollywood Reporter, he said: "One thing I know is that this is genre; and playing around with the thriller, horror, action, fun genre of intrigue is my favourite.

"That's my sweet spot. So I think tonally it should resemble 'Get Out'.

"That said, I want to make a completely different movie.

"I want to address something different than race in the next one."

'Get Out' follows interracial couple Chris ( Daniel Kaluuya) and his girlfriend, Rose (Allison Williams), who have reached the meet-the-parents stage of dating.

She invites him for a weekend getaway with her parents and, at first, Chris reads the family's overly accommodating behaviour as nervous attempts to deal with their daughter's relationship.

But during the weekend, a series of increasingly disturbing discoveries and bizarre encounters with the family's white neighbours and friends lead him to a truth that he never could have imagined.

It looks like fans will be getting their next film from Peele as director next year.

it's reported that Peele has an "untitled social thriller" with Universal in the pipeline, which is slated for release in March 2019.

Meanwhile, the 'Keanu' actor recently admitted he was tempted to star in 'Get Out'.

Asked about the possibility, he said: "It crossed my mind, a couple of times, but no.

"I wanted to direct this and I needed actors who were better than me.

"I have to say, in working with the actors for the movie, I did feel like, in talking to them, I had become the character, as well, to an extent, so that I could access the emotion that I was asking them to access, in order to describe what I was looking for from the scene.

"It was a very emotional process, for that reason. I felt what the characters felt."